A ranking of the best chairs at Hopkins

By SAMHITA ILANGO

KAREEM OSMAN/PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR The Mudd Atrium has big red couches that are perfect for naps.

KAREEM OSMAN/PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR
The Mudd Atrium has big red couches that are perfect for naps.

think I spend a good chunk of my time at Hopkins sitting. Sitting behind tables on M-level, sitting on wheelie chairs in Brody, lecture halls in Hodson, classrooms in Gilman. Sitting and then drooping to a horizontal in The Hut. And despite all this time spent sitting, we often overlook the comfort of what’s cushioning the tush. So here it is, my personal compilation of all things cushioned and comfy, specified for the students’ needs. Right here on campus.

BEST CHAIR FOR LECTURES: Hodson 210

Hodson 210 makes the college experience real. It’s the mid-size lecture hall with dual screens that every college movie features. The chairs are incredible. They swivel smoothly and have ample room in between each. A good hour sitting in those light grey, red-cushioned babies provides a unique experience. I can leisurely lean back, feeling the chair bend in a slight tilt backwards, while also able to swivel forward up to the desk to jot some lecture notes two minutes later. Versatile.

BEST CHAIRS FOR STUDYING WITH A TABLE: M-level High Tables

I’ll just throw a disclaimer now that I am biased toward these chairs. They’ve been through the good and the bad, seating me through many long nights turned mornings. Oddly the anxiety I get sometimes looking at these chairs have now fostered a sense of comfort and security. These chairs make me feel executive and efficient. I can’t determine if it’s the raised level these chairs are set at that do the trick, but the combination of the navy blue clothed arc in the back and friendly spin these wheeled chairs greet me with have made for the most productive of nights. And if you have yet to try adjusting the arms on these chairs, I recommend giving it a shot. It’s well worth it.

BEST CHAIRS FOR READING: The Hut in Gilman

Gilman, home to many chairs, has really outdone itself with the variety of options within a 100-foot stretch. But I have to say, when readings for class need to get done, the brown leather chairs that face the stained glass windows of the Hut really welcome you. When I sink into these chairs I am not only welcomed with cushioned comfort but also sturdy arms that flank either side of the chairs that mean serious business. It’s comfortable to the point you can flop down well, but structured in a way that your highlighter and pen won’t get lost in its leather. And hey, have you checked out the fine piece of glass in front of you? It only adds to the experience.

BEST CHAIRS FOR NAPPING INDOORS: Mudd Atrium

Aside from the biology department and the Daily Grind, Mudd Hall is home to some rocking chairs. And no, I am not talking about the rocking chairs that line the right side of the atrium. I am talking about the bright red couches and chairs that scatter the space. These vibrant red chairs and couches really serve the napping needs. And real talk, these couches wrap you like a big Clifford-sized hug.

CHAIR THAT CONFUSES ME: Brody Terrace white metal chairs

KAREEM OSMAN/PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR The chairs on the Brody Terrace just don’t make very much sense.

KAREEM OSMAN/PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR
The chairs on the Brody Terrace just don’t make very much sense.

From time to time, you come across a smattering of chairs on campus that try to take seating to a whole new level. I find one worth mentioning. The wide white chairs found on Brody Terrace have struck me as odd for ages. Sitting in standard posture, you look strange and it’s uncomfortable. You try to lean your back against the seat and you look like a toddler with your feet flailing above ground. So you try going horizontal and wrapping yourself in an egg shape. Sure, that works. The chair cradles you nicely. But that’s just it. Not comfortable enough to nap in and I’m too egg-like to do work. Okay, Hopkins.  Unchairted territory.

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